Lightweight Sports Car Philosophy – Car and Driver

Some days I feel like I sift through an endless sea of crappy car stuff on the internet trying to find gems to post here on the blog. I worry about being able to tell the difference between just hitting a drought that day or if I’m just becoming jaded and hard to impress after being exposed to a massive volume of content. That’s why it was refreshing to come across this video from Sam Smith of Car and Driver today. He takes a 1967 Lotus Elan and Mazda’s MX-5 Super 20 Concept for a spin out at Laguna Seca for all of us to enjoy. Smith discusses why the Elan was a significant car when it was produced and which of its successful aspects inspired Mazda when they made the first MX-5 Miata. The discussion ends up touching on what the true definition of a “driver’s car” should be. I’m glad to see there are still automotive journalists who are not too rock star to appreciate lightweight sports cars with modest power. It’s still somewhat of a mystery to me why so many people love the Mazda MX-5 but cry bloody murder about how the Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ┬ádon’t have enough power. That’s the difference between road racers and forum “tuners,” I guess. There goes the jaded part of me talking again. Enjoy the video:


Source: Car and Driver on YouTube

Chris Harris Track Tests The New Lotus Exige S

The new Lotus Exige S is based on the current Exige chassis, but has the supercharged V8 from the Evora S, redesigned body work and a completely new rear axle. Lotus has also gotten aboard the the new age of electronic sports cars that was ushered in by the Nissan GT-R a few years ago. This car is equipped with an active traction control computer that calculates the coefficient of friction between the tires and the road surface on the fly. It’s the first car that I’ve heard of that does that instead of using a fixed programmed value. Harris talks extensively about the significance of the car to the company and gives it a good run on the Lotus test track.


Source: Drive YouTube Channel